Agile BI Building Blocks 2.0

Quite a while ago, I published a blog post about my Agile BI Maturity Model. In this post I’d like to show you the current state of the model.

First of all I renamed the model to “Agile BI Building Blocks”. I don’t like the “maturity” term anymore as it somehow values the way you are doing things. Building blocks are more neutral. I simply want to show what aspects you need to take into consideration to introduce Agile BI in a sustainable way. The following picture shows the current model:

What changed compared to version 1? Let me go through the individual building blocks:

  1. Agile Basics & Mindset. No change – still very important: You need to start with agile basics and the agile mindset. A good starting point is still the Agile Manifesto or the newer Modern Agile.
  2. Envision Cycle & Inception Phase. No change – this about the importance of the Inception Phase especially for BI project. Simply don’t jump straight into development but do some minimal upfront work like setup the infrastructure or create a highlevel release scope and secure funding.
  3. BI specific User Stories. Changed the term from simply User Stories to “BI specific User Stories”. Unfortunately I didn’t manage to write a blog post about this yet, but in my recent workshop materials you’ll find some ideas around it.
  4. No / Relative Estimating. Changed from Relative Estimating (which is mainly about Story Points) to include also No Estimating which is basically about the #NoEstimates movement. I held a recent presentation at TDWI Schweiz 2017 about this topic (in German only for now)
  5. (Self Organizing) Teams. Changed and put the term “Self Organizing” in brackets as this building block is about teams and team roles in general.
  6. Workspace & Co-Location. Added “Workspace” as this building block is not only about co-location (though this is an important aspect of the agile workspace in general)
  7. Agile Contracting. No change, in my recent presentation at TDWI Schweiz 2017 I talked about Agile Contracting including giving an overview of the idea of the “Agiler Festpreis”, more details you can find in the (German) book here.
  8. New: Data Modeling & Metadata Mgt. Not only for AgileBI data modeling tool support and the question around how to deal with metadata is crucial. In combination with Data Warehouse Automation these elements become even more important in the context of AgileBI.
  9. New: Data Warehouse Automation. The more I work with Data Warehouse Automation tools like WhereScape, the more I wonder how we could work previously without it. These kind of tools are an important building block on your journey of becoming a more agile BI environment. You can get a glimpse at these tools in my recent TDWI / BI-Spektrum article (again, in German only unfortunately)
  10. Version Control. No change here – still a pity that version control and integration into common tools like Git are not standard in the BI world.
  11. Test Automation. No change here, a very important aspect. Glad to see finally some DWH specific tools emerging like BiGeval.
  12. Lean & Fast processes. No change here – this block refers to introducing an iterative-incremental process. There are various kinds of process frameworks available. I personally favor Disciplined Agile providing you with a goal-centric approach and a choice of different delivery lifecycles.
  13. Identify & Apply Design Patterns. No change except that I removed “Development Standards” as a separate building block as these are often tool or technology specific formings of a given design pattern. Common design patterns in the BI world range from requirements modeling patterns (e.g. the BEAM method by Lawrence Corr as well as the IBIREF framework) to data modeling patterns like Data Vault or Dimensional Modeling and design patterns for data visualization like the IBCS standards.
  14. New: Basic Refactoring. Refactoring is a crucial skill to become more agile and continously improve already existing artefacts. Basic refactoring means that you are able to do a refactoring within the same technology or tool type, e.g. within the database using database refactoring patterns.
  15. New: Additive Iterative Data Modeling. At a certain step in your journey to AgileBI you can’t draw the full data model upfront but want to design the model more iteratively. A first step into that direction is the additive way, that means you typically enhance your data model iteration by iteration, but you model in a way that the existing model isn’t changed much. A good resource around agile / iterative modeling can be found here.
  16. Test Driven Development / Design (TDD). No change here. On the data warehouse layer tools like BiGeval simplify the application of this approach tremendously. There are also materials availble online to learn more about TDD in the database context.
  17. Sandbox Development Infrastructure. No change, but also not much progress since version 1.0. Most BI systems I know still work with a three or four system landscape. No way that every developer has its own full stack.
  18. Datalab Sandboxes. No change. The idea here is that (power) business users can get their own, temporary data warehouse copy to run their own analysis and add and integrate their own data. I see this currently only in the data science context, where a data scientist uses such a playground to experiment with data of various kinds.
  19. Scriptable BI/DWH toolset. No change. Still a very important aspect. If your journey to AgileBI takes you to this third stage of “Agile Infrastructure & Patterns” which includes topics like individual developer environments and subsequently Continuous Integration, a scriptable BI/DWH toolset is an important precondition. Otherwise automation will become pretty difficult.
  20. Continuous Integration. No change. Still a vision for me – will definitely need some more time to invest into this in the BI context.
  21. Push Button Deployments. No change. Data Warehouse Automation tools (cf. building block 9) can help with this a lot already. Still need a lot of manual automation coding to have link with test automation or a coordinated deployment for multiple technology and tool layers.
  22. New: Multilayer Refactoring. In contrast to Basic Refactoring (cf. building block 14) this is the vision that you can refactor your artefacts across multiple technologies and tools. Clearly a vison (and not yet reality) for me…
  23. New:  Heavy Iterative Data Modeling. In contrast to Additive Iterative Data Modeling (cf. building block 15) this is about the vision that you can constantly evolve your data model incl. existing aspects of it. Having the multilayer refactoring capabilities is an important precondition to achieve this.

Looking at my own journey towards more agility in BI and data warehouse environments, I’m in the midst of the second phase about basic infrastructure and basic patterns & standards. Looking forward to an exciting year 2018. Maybe the jump over the chasm will work 😉

What about your journey? Where are you now? Do you have experience with the building blocks in the third phase about agile infrastructure & patterns? Let me know in the comments section!

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