Optimizing my dashboard: Creating a visual draft

Remember my last post about the Webi dashboard? As mentioned at the end of that post aimed to show a technical trick to put an interactive kind of a button onto a Webi report. Now this post is the first in a series of posts how to optimize the layout of the initial dashboard. Let’s start with creating a draft of our optimized dashboard layout. The advantage of such a draft is that it is not yet implemented with the actual BI tool but using either pen and pencil or a wireframing tool. I did the later and chose the cloud edition of Balsamiq. To get a quick start you can use a 30 days trial account.

Let me explain briefly how the tool works. After that I’ll explain some of my thoughts behind the chosen layout.
Within the editor you can drag and drop sketched objects like a window container, rectangles, text, buttons etc.

Balsamiq_Editor
My dashboard in the Balsamiq editor

Looking at the available chart objects, I’m not really satisfied:

Balsamiq_Charts
Default chart elements in Balsamiq

Therefore I added my own images representing typical IBCS chart types (IBCS stands for International Business Communication Standards. I wrote a short blog post about IBCS here.). The images are based on the graphomate add-on for SAP DesignStudio and BusinessObjects Dashboards.

IBCS_charts
Typical IBCS chart types (created with graphomate)

After all, my inital dashboard draft looks like this:

Page01.jpeg
My dashboard draft (chart view 1)

At the top you can see some reserved space for an appropriate title. Providing this is a major requirement stated by IBCS as one of the top ten proposals:

02_Titles
Source & Copyright: http://www.ibcs-a.org/images/IBCS/Boxen/TopTen/02_Titles.jpg

I adapted this to a BI specific title concept where I distinguish between general title elements (like the organization or global query filters) and object specific titles, e.g. for the table or a chart. For the table I used the default element of Balsamiq, maybe I will update this later on with an IBCS optimized one. For now it is just a placeholder.

The charts in this first view will show current year values and previous year values (where as the current year will be indicated within the global filters area) for revenue and margin. To make the analysis of available data more straight forward, I decided to add two variance charts, one for absolute values and one with percentage values. Again, this is one of the top 10 elements in IBCS:

07_Variances
Source & Copyright: http://www.ibcs-a.org/images/IBCS/Boxen/TopTen/07_Variances.jpg

You might have discovered the symbolic button to switch the chart view. The second view looks like this:

Page02.jpeg
My dashboard draft (chart view 2)

The header and table areas stay the same. In the lower area with charts I now show historical values for revenue with actual and plan values. Instead of putting everything into one big chart I decided to use small multiples for the top 5 product lines (based on total revenue over time) as well as one chart for all other product lines. Depending on how it will look like in Webi we might decide to show more product lines or add another topic to the dashboard (as we still have space left on the bottom right corner).

In this blog I showed how to create a simple dashboard draft using a wireframeing tool like Balsamiq. In addition I pointed out how to apply two of the top ten IBCS proposals in this conceptual phase.

Update May 5, 2015: Internally at IT-Logix we continued the implementation of the above shown mockup; we used both Design Studio and Web Intelligence. Unfortunately the time for writing a blog post was missing so far. Still, if you are interested in the Web Intelligence part, have a look at the following sapInsider BI2015 session held by my teammate Kristof Gramm: http://bit.ly/1EGKFtA He will show how you can do pretty amazing things with Webi (by the way, using this link you’ll be granted a 300€ discount on the conference registration 😉

IBCS – an emerging standard for business #dataviz

In my previous post I introduced the SUCCESS model of Rolf Hichert. In this post I’d like to introduce you to the subject of IBCS – the International Business Communication Standards. IBCS’ aim is to “foster the level of understanding in reports and presentations” (Source: IBCS). Currently, IBCS consists of two main parts:

Notation of meaning
The part “Notation of meaning” describes basically the semantics of a standardized business communication language. It covers all aspects of meaning in the context of business communication and suggests an appropriate notation.

Design of components
The part “Design of components” covers rather the syntactical aspects of a standardized business communication language. It describes the basic report elements and specific rules to use them for the design of objects such as tables and charts. Several objects and additional elements make up complete pages. Although this part should not consider aspects of meaning, but only define the “grammar” of a unified communication language, some overlap to the “Notation of meaning” (semantics) is inevitable. (Source: IBCS)

IBCS and SUCCESS are closely related, therefore I will start with some explenations about how the two topics are positioned against each other. First of all SUCCESS and IBCS can be looked at from a time perspective. Clearly, SUCCESS was developed first:

Folie1

From this point of view IBCS  is a refinement of certain aspects of SUCCESS (namely the Unify part in SUCCESS). This refinement can be seen in the following perspective too:

Folie2

SUCCESS provides only generic guidelines without concrete implementation details, e.g. the following one:

UnifyStandardDimensions
Souce & Copyright: HICHERT + PARTNER

This guideline just tells you: If you visualize this year’s revenue with blue in chart number 1, you should also use blue in chart number 2. But the guideline doesn’t tell you to always use blue. If you wish to take brown for current revenue, it’s OK. Just use brown whenever you visualize current revenue. This and many of the other guidelines (some of them are mentioned in my previous blog post) in SUCCESS I therefore attribute to what I call “common sense” or data visualization basic recommendations. Now IBCS comes into play. Whereas SUCCESS is rather generic IBCS defines the details and writes them down. As indicated above IBCS does this in mainly two parts:

– the notation of meaning clearly defines which elements have which meaning:

UnifyStandardDimensionsIBCS
Source: IBCS

This way business communication should be simplified through standardization the same way as you are used to it with geographical maps for example. Blue always means water, north is always at the top of the map etc. This “semantic layer” is something which differentiates IBCS from other data visualization and information design concepts. Most if not all of them focus on generic recommendations only. In contrast, IBCS wants to harmonize the visualizations in a business context and make them therefore easier to understand.

– the second aspect of IBCS is the design of components

Let’s have a look at the SUCCESS guidline first, e.g. for chart design:

Source & Copyright: HICHERT + PARTNER
Source & Copyright: HICHERT + PARTNER

IBCS gives you much more information, e.g. regarding legends:

LegendsIBCS
Source: IBCS

You can look at IBCS and SUCCESS from a third perspective too:

Folie3

In this perspective IBCS is the solid base with all the detailed rules to consider for efficient data visualizations in business communications. Yet the IBCS rules are hard to digest (as every other industry standard…) SUCCESS can be seen as an implementation methodology of them (as IBCS and SUCCESS are mostly congurent to each other). SUCCESS is an acronym of seven verbs – if you act on them, you’ll see that implementing IBCS is pretty straight forward.

IBCS is work in progress and it is open-source (based on the Creative Commons BY-SA license). Its further development is orchestrated by the IBCS Association which again is run by HICHERT + PARTNER. Simply create a login on ibcs-a.org and start to add your own ideas to further refine and extend the standard.

If you want to learn more about IBCS, SUCCESS and how it can be implemented, join me during the BOAK conference this autumn. It takes place on Tuesday, September 16th in Zurich / Switzerland. In the data visualization track (sessions E1 to E4) you’ll find several sessions dedicated to IBCS. Jürgen Faisst, CEO of HICHERT + PARTNER will elaborate on the goals of IBCS. My friend Lars Schubert will demonstrate how you can apply IBCS using the IBCS certified software “graphomate” as part of SAP Design Studio or SAP BusinessObjects Dashboards. I myself will present together with a customer showing how we implemented an IBCS oriented design in Web Intelligence. The day after I will teach these best practices during a one day workshop. A sneak peek on the Webi reports you can find on my Hichert Certified Consultant page. Looking forward to seeing you during the BOAK conference!

What do you think about IBCS and the semantic layer? Do you think it is worth the effort to harmonize data visualizations in a business context? Just add a comment now!